WV electric generation up in October - WTRF 7 News Sports Weather - Wheeling Steubenville

WV electric generation up in October

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  • Many WV coal counties losing revenue

    Many WV coal counties losing revenue

    Monday, August 8 2016 10:15 AM EDT2016-08-08 14:15:05 GMT

    As Appalachian coal production continues its drastic decline, West Virginia’s coal-producing counties are  not only losing people as lifelong residents are forced to flee their homes in order to find work, but in many cases, they’re also relinquishing millions of dollars from their budgets.

    As Appalachian coal production continues its drastic decline, West Virginia’s coal-producing counties are  not only losing people as lifelong residents are forced to flee their homes in order to find work, but in many cases, they’re also relinquishing millions of dollars from their budgets.

West Virginia's electricity producers saw an increase in production in October, aided in part by the December 2011 startup of the Longview power station.

According to preliminary figures released by the Energy Information Administration on Dec. 27, West Virginia's electric power industry produced 5,578,529 megawatt hours in October, up about 14 percent from the 4,877,226 Mwh produced in October 2011.

The Longview plant itself produced about 414,177 Mwh in October, according to EIA figures.

Most of the electricity generated in the state was produced by coal. The three largest coal-burning generators were owned by subsidiaries of American Electric Power. They were the John E. Amos power plant in Putnam County, the Mitchell power plant in Marshall County and the Mountaineer plant in Mason County. Next on the list were three FirstEnergy stations – Pleasants, Harrison and Fort Martin – followed by Dominion's Mount Storm power station and Longview, which is owned by GenPower.

Wind was the second-largest power source in the Mountain State in October, led by NedPower's Mount Storm plant, according to the EIA. The five wind stations, though, produced less than 2 percent of the electricity generated by burning coal.

Hydropower was third on the power source list, followed by natural gas and petroleum.

 

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